lindahall:

Andreas Libavius - Scientist of the Day

Andreas Libavius, a German chemist, died July 25, 1616, at about 56 years of age. In 1597, Libavius published a book, Alchymia, that, in spite of its title, is seen by many modern chemists as the foundation book of their discipline. Libavius at the time preferred the word “alchemy” to “chemistry” because the latter word had been co-opted by followers of Paracelsus and was a mystical, magical art practiced in secrecy, mostly at the courts of such rulers as Rudolf II. Libavius wanted chemistry to be an academic and a laboratory discipline, divorced from astrology and natural magic, and concerned only with the nature of matter and its combinations, and he wanted it taught openly in the universities, not hidden away at royal courts. Libavius was none too pleased when the first professorship of chemistry was finally established at Marburg in 1609, because the professor appointed was Johannes Hartmann, a Paracelsian and a favorite at the court of Moritz of Hesse. But Libavius’s attitude did ultimately win the day, and although his word “alchymia” was replaced by “chemiatria”, everything else he argued for came to pass, as chemistry came to be established as an open empirical science, based on observations and experiments accessible to every practitioner. We have five of Libavius’s original works in the History of Science Collection, including 1st and 2nd editions of his Alchymia.

Our copy of the second edition of the Alchymia is an especially handsome specimen, with its stamped vellum boards still held closed by a beautiful pair of bronze clasps. The second edition is important because, unlike the 1st (1597) edition, it has a number of woodcuts illustrating an ideal modern chemical laboratory, including a design for the building itself, and plans for all sorts of furnaces and alembics for distillation.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(via smithsonianlibraries)

crlblck:

Hubert Robert

Robert des Ruines

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quiet-desperati0n:

I am a feminist because
I don’t think this video could be much more relevant.

(via cormallen)

house-of-gnar:

Incomplete duplication by Prof. Jas. Mundie on Flickr.
Diprosopus cephalothoracopagus conjoined twins 

"Although not visible in this photograph (obviously), there is a second imperfectly formed face on the back side of the head. This is an extremely rare form of conjunction in humans."

house-of-gnar:

Incomplete duplication by Prof. Jas. Mundie on Flickr.

Diprosopus cephalothoracopagus conjoined twins 

"Although not visible in this photograph (obviously), there is a second imperfectly formed face on the back side of the head. This is an extremely rare form of conjunction in humans."

kqedscience:

Discovery Of ‘Electric Bacteria’ Hints At The Potential For Alien Life
“Microbiologists have learned that certain strains of bacteria are capable of using energy in its purest form by eating and breathing electrons. It’s a discovery that demonstrates an entirely new mode of life on Earth — and possibly beyond.”
Learn more from io9. 

kqedscience:

Discovery Of ‘Electric Bacteria’ Hints At The Potential For Alien Life

Microbiologists have learned that certain strains of bacteria are capable of using energy in its purest form by eating and breathing electrons. It’s a discovery that demonstrates an entirely new mode of life on Earth — and possibly beyond.”

Learn more from io9. 

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

(via aurush444)

kanonierasch:

I had found and posted some of these from ebay.de a while back. I wanted to post this now to credit the artist along with the history behind them. Now you know ;-)

drittenreichkunst:

The original set of six full-color 6 x 8-1/4 inch prints made from watercolors painted in France during World War II by Wehrmacht Gefreiter G. Schmitz and sold to troops of the German occupation in France during the Third Reich are now very rare. The six prints came in a typical European art folio titled Oh-la-la…! published by Europa-Edition of Paris and sold for 1 Reichsmark or 20 French Francs.

The six prints are Oh-la-la! (a German guard leering at a beautiful French maid on her way home from the market with eggs and bread) Sans Ticket (two German soldiers admiring a tiny French bra) Je ne comprends pas (a German soldier making a pass at a sweet young French girl) Grand filou (a German Landser with beer making conversation with a lovely French maid) and two untitled prints - both showing Wehrmacht soldiers in goodbye embraces kissing beautiful French girls.

(via fuehrerbefehl)

earthandanimals:

Master class on fishing by Igor Shilokhvost

(via house-of-gnar)

Every star is a sun as big, as bright, as our own. Just imagine, how far away from us you’d have to move the sun to make it appear as small and faint as a star. The light from the stars travels very fast. Faster than anything. But not infinitely fast. It takes time for their light to reach us. For the nearest ones, it takes years. For others, centuries. Some stars are so far away it takes eons for their light to get to Earth.

By the time the light from some stars gets here they are already dead. For those stars, we see only their ghosts. We see their light, but their bodies perished long, long ago.

- Episode 5: A Sky Full Of Ghosts, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

(via house-of-gnar)

fortunecookied:

Betty Boop - Bimbo’s Initiation (1931)

Bimbo has to undergo a series of harrowing rituals as part of a secret society initiation before eventually discovering the true identity of the order’s mysterious leader. This surreal short was the last Betty Boop cartoon to be animated by her co-creator Grim Natwick.

(via tacoremixparty)

spaceplasma:

The Cassini spacecraft’s narrow angle camera captured Saturn’s moon Rhea as it gradually slipped into the planet’s shadow – an event known as “ingress”. 
Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

spaceplasma:

The Cassini spacecraft’s narrow angle camera captured Saturn’s moon Rhea as it gradually slipped into the planet’s shadow – an event known as “ingress”.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

mudwerks:

(via Benito Mussolini - Wikipedia)

Mug shot of the later Italian Fascist leader Benito Mussolini, following his arrest by Swiss police for lack of identification papers, 19th of June 1903.

mudwerks:

(via Benito Mussolini - Wikipedia)

Mug shot of the later Italian Fascist leader Benito Mussolini, following his arrest by Swiss police for lack of identification papers, 19th of June 1903.

wolfhalden:

A Hare in the Forest, 1585
Nibbling on a leaf pulled from a stalk of Lady’s Mantle, an alert hare sits at the edge of a pine forest. Unlike the darkness one would expect to find in a forest, Hans Hoffmann painted a theatrically illuminated scene. Each plant and insect—snail, cricket, beetle—is seen in vivid detail. The finely wrought leaves of the thistle, the sprawling fronds of a plantain, and the bright blue flowers of the Hare Bell attest to Hoffmann’s meticulous treatment of the subject. In fact, none of these plants could have co-existed in the natural world. Hoffmann imaginatively combined numerous individual nature studies in a single painting. Hoffmann’s golden-brown hare is based on Albrecht Dürer’s famous and influential watercolor which, much like his Stag Beetle, shows a hare against a plain ground. Hoffmann had seen Dürer’s hare while in Nuremburg. Later, when he went to work in the court of Emperor Rudolf II, he helped the Emperor acquire the watercolor for hisKunstkammer. Hoffmann’s hare differs from Dürer’s however, appearing amid a striking arrangement of elegant plants and insects. At the time it was painted, this arrangement of nearly life-size subjects was entirely unique, not only within Hoffmann’s body of work, but also within the tradition of German nature study. 
Hans Hoffmann (b. about 1530 Nuremberg, Germany, d. about 1591 Prague, Czech Republic)

wolfhalden:

A Hare in the Forest, 1585

Nibbling on a leaf pulled from a stalk of Lady’s Mantle, an alert hare sits at the edge of a pine forest. Unlike the darkness one would expect to find in a forest, Hans Hoffmann painted a theatrically illuminated scene. Each plant and insect—snail, cricket, beetle—is seen in vivid detail. The finely wrought leaves of the thistle, the sprawling fronds of a plantain, and the bright blue flowers of the Hare Bell attest to Hoffmann’s meticulous treatment of the subject. In fact, none of these plants could have co-existed in the natural world. Hoffmann imaginatively combined numerous individual nature studies in a single painting. 

Hoffmann’s golden-brown hare is based on Albrecht Dürer’s famous and influential watercolor which, much like his Stag Beetle, shows a hare against a plain ground. Hoffmann had seen Dürer’s hare while in Nuremburg. Later, when he went to work in the court of Emperor Rudolf II, he helped the Emperor acquire the watercolor for hisKunstkammer. Hoffmann’s hare differs from Dürer’s however, appearing amid a striking arrangement of elegant plants and insects. At the time it was painted, this arrangement of nearly life-size subjects was entirely unique, not only within Hoffmann’s body of work, but also within the tradition of German nature study. 

Hans Hoffmann (b. about 1530 Nuremberg, Germany, d. about 1591 Prague, Czech Republic)

(via greedylittlepig)