pistonwings:

Republic P-47 Thunderbolt

One of the largest and heaviest aircraft to be powered by a single engine. Powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp, it could carry over half the payload of a B-17. 

An effective escort fighter, P-47’s were flown by USAF in the European and Pacific theaters. 

(via airmanisr)

oldbookillustrations:

The wolf and the crane.

Charles Henry Bennett, from The fables of Æsop and others, London, 1857.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

The wolf and the crane.

Charles Henry Bennett, from The fables of Æsop and others, London, 1857.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

wapiti3:

Bug vs. bug: nature’s method of controlling injurious species, by John Isaac,;1906 on Flickr.

Contributing Library:
Library of Congress
BioDivLibrary

(via scientificillustration)

IC5070 - The Pelican Nebula by Jesús M. Vargas and Maritxu Poyal

"New reprocessed. This time the sum total of Narrow Band + RGB + Luminance Halfa shots, treated with stars."

The Pelican Nebula is an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The gaseous contortions of this emission nebula bear a resemblance to a pelican, giving rise to its name. [**]

(via house-of-gnar)

house-of-gnar:

Embryonic development during ectopic pragnancy | Lunar Caustic on Flickr

  • (1) Embryo in gestational sac.
  • (2) 3-4 weeks
  • (3) 4-5 weeks
  • (4) 6-7 weeks
  • (5) 7-8 weeks
  • (6) 8-10 weeks
  • (7) 9-10 weeks
  • (8) 10-12 weeks
sixpenceee:

Baby wombat

sixpenceee:

Baby wombat

(via koofteh)

centreforaviation:

Ju88 from KG 51, France 1940.

centreforaviation:

Ju88 from KG 51, France 1940.

goldisblood:

Árpád, Grand Prince of the Hungarians
The head of the Hungarian tribes during the 9th and 10th centuries, Árpád was considered the sacred ruler or kende of the Hungarians and possible their military leader or gyula as well. Hungarians today consider him the founder of their country because of his role in conquering the Carpathian Basin. His dynasty would rule Hungary until 1301. At the dawn of his conquest, the Byzantine Emperor Leo VI sent envoys “to give presents” and incite Árpád into invading the Bulgarian Empire, which he subsequently did and defeated them. Although later the Bulgarians would hire the Penchangs to raid Hungarian territory and forced Árpád to look for a safer homeland across the Carpathian Basin. Shortly after this Árpád conquered Transylvania and authorised himself to conquer the rest of the Carpathian Basin. Once he had died, his body was buried in “the City of King Atilla” (believed to be that of ancient Aquincum).

goldisblood:

Árpád, Grand Prince of the Hungarians

The head of the Hungarian tribes during the 9th and 10th centuries, Árpád was considered the sacred ruler or kende of the Hungarians and possible their military leader or gyula as well. Hungarians today consider him the founder of their country because of his role in conquering the Carpathian Basin. His dynasty would rule Hungary until 1301. At the dawn of his conquest, the Byzantine Emperor Leo VI sent envoys “to give presents” and incite Árpád into invading the Bulgarian Empire, which he subsequently did and defeated them. Although later the Bulgarians would hire the Penchangs to raid Hungarian territory and forced Árpád to look for a safer homeland across the Carpathian Basin. Shortly after this Árpád conquered Transylvania and authorised himself to conquer the rest of the Carpathian Basin. Once he had died, his body was buried in “the City of King Atilla” (believed to be that of ancient Aquincum).

(via greedylittlepig)

bryskye:

40 years ago to this day, the Panavia Tornado took to the skies for the very first time.

A multinational project between Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom, it remains the backbone of all three nations strike capabilities, having served with distinction over Afghanistan, Bosnia, Iraq and Libya.

When it comes to ultra low-level flight in any weather, nothing else in service comes close.

I have some archive footage of that very first flight uploaded to my youtube, which can be viewed here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBUyBF1AgUI#t=8m14s

(via airmanisr)

thegildedcentury:

Life, August 9, 1948

thegildedcentury:

Life, August 9, 1948

(via cormallen)

letsdolaunch:

Model, Tsiolkovsky Space Craft
Soviet model makers built this spacecraft based on the designs and notes of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky. Late in his life, much of Tsiolkovsky’s theoretical work focused on ideas about transporting humans into space on board rockets. Although this model, reflecting the scientist’s ideas, grossly overestimates the living space available on board a rocket, it does convey a sophisticated understanding of the physical constraints of space travel for that time. Among Tsiolkovsky’s concerns were the effects of acceleration and weightlessness on the human body
via smithsonian

letsdolaunch:

Model, Tsiolkovsky Space Craft

Soviet model makers built this spacecraft based on the designs and notes of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky. Late in his life, much of Tsiolkovsky’s theoretical work focused on ideas about transporting humans into space on board rockets. Although this model, reflecting the scientist’s ideas, grossly overestimates the living space available on board a rocket, it does convey a sophisticated understanding of the physical constraints of space travel for that time. Among Tsiolkovsky’s concerns were the effects of acceleration and weightlessness on the human body

via smithsonian

(via cormallen)

humanoidhistory:

The Hercules cluster of galaxies, imaged by Ken Crawford. More from NASA  “These are galaxies of the Hercules Cluster, an archipelago of island universes a mere 500 million light-years away. Also known as Abell 2151, this cluster is loaded with gas and dust rich, star-forming spiral galaxies but has relatively few elliptical galaxies, which lack gas and dust and the associated newborn stars. The colors in this remarkably deep composite image clearly show the star forming galaxies with a blue tint and galaxies with older stellar populations with a yellowish cast. The sharp picture spans about 3/4 degree across the cluster center, corresponding to over 6 million light-years at the cluster’s estimated distance. Diffraction spikes around brighter foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy are produced by the imaging telescope’s mirror support vanes. In the cosmic vista many galaxies seem to be colliding or merging while others seem distorted - clear evidence that cluster galaxies commonly interact. In fact, the Hercules Cluster itself may be seen as the result of ongoing mergers of smaller galaxy clusters and is thought to be similar to young galaxy clusters in the much more distant, early Universe.” (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

The Hercules cluster of galaxies, imaged by Ken Crawford. More from NASA  “These are galaxies of the Hercules Cluster, an archipelago of island universes a mere 500 million light-years away. Also known as Abell 2151, this cluster is loaded with gas and dust rich, star-forming spiral galaxies but has relatively few elliptical galaxies, which lack gas and dust and the associated newborn stars. The colors in this remarkably deep composite image clearly show the star forming galaxies with a blue tint and galaxies with older stellar populations with a yellowish cast. The sharp picture spans about 3/4 degree across the cluster center, corresponding to over 6 million light-years at the cluster’s estimated distance. Diffraction spikes around brighter foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy are produced by the imaging telescope’s mirror support vanes. In the cosmic vista many galaxies seem to be colliding or merging while others seem distorted - clear evidence that cluster galaxies commonly interact. In fact, the Hercules Cluster itself may be seen as the result of ongoing mergers of smaller galaxy clusters and is thought to be similar to young galaxy clusters in the much more distant, early Universe.” (NASA)

lindahall:

Andreas Libavius - Scientist of the Day

Andreas Libavius, a German chemist, died July 25, 1616, at about 56 years of age. In 1597, Libavius published a book, Alchymia, that, in spite of its title, is seen by many modern chemists as the foundation book of their discipline. Libavius at the time preferred the word “alchemy” to “chemistry” because the latter word had been co-opted by followers of Paracelsus and was a mystical, magical art practiced in secrecy, mostly at the courts of such rulers as Rudolf II. Libavius wanted chemistry to be an academic and a laboratory discipline, divorced from astrology and natural magic, and concerned only with the nature of matter and its combinations, and he wanted it taught openly in the universities, not hidden away at royal courts. Libavius was none too pleased when the first professorship of chemistry was finally established at Marburg in 1609, because the professor appointed was Johannes Hartmann, a Paracelsian and a favorite at the court of Moritz of Hesse. But Libavius’s attitude did ultimately win the day, and although his word “alchymia” was replaced by “chemiatria”, everything else he argued for came to pass, as chemistry came to be established as an open empirical science, based on observations and experiments accessible to every practitioner. We have five of Libavius’s original works in the History of Science Collection, including 1st and 2nd editions of his Alchymia.

Our copy of the second edition of the Alchymia is an especially handsome specimen, with its stamped vellum boards still held closed by a beautiful pair of bronze clasps. The second edition is important because, unlike the 1st (1597) edition, it has a number of woodcuts illustrating an ideal modern chemical laboratory, including a design for the building itself, and plans for all sorts of furnaces and alembics for distillation.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(via smithsonianlibraries)